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aancedproach to deficit reduction and strengthen the middle class. as i said, last week our focus in the next little while will be on guns and budget, talked about budget. i will be joined by my colleague, congressman mike thompson of california. congressman thompson is a vietnam vet, a wounded vietnam vet. he is a gun owner, hunter. is the head of our task force on gun violence prevention, and he is a co-author of the bipartisan bill in the house with peter king. to put forth a manchin-toomey compromise that failed, so sadly, in the senate last night. we are so disappointed. our sorrow was expressed so appropriately by president obama last night that i invited mike to join us here to tell you where we go from here and to answer the question that people are saying what can we do to change this. mike, would you speak -- thank you for your leadership. >> thank you, leader pelosi. it's a pleasure and honor to join you, to talk about and to answer any questions that you guys may have on gun violence prevention. -manchin amendment that failefailed last night, as i thk everybody knows. it was every
. that means we're using deficit and regaining increasing competitiveness. becae a lo member states underestimated in the first years of the common currency that the pressure on competitiveness in the common currency resulted possibility of devaluation. it's huge. and if you don't improve your competitiveness, you will get major problems. it has happened in -- you will not feel it in the first years, but it will happen. and it did. therefore, we always have to -- [inaudible] member states, oblige member states to stick to european rules in, of course, a balanced way to enhance their competitiveness by structure reforms, and then we can, we have built a european mechanism through different systems to buy time until they regain access to financial markets. this worked in ireland, in portugal. in fact, in the last year we increase, by the way. i think it will work in cyprus as well. and if you look at the -- [inaudible] we have halved the national deficits in the eurozone in the last three years. delivering our commitment, by the way. we have halfved the difference in the -- halved the
significant problems, and i think if we don't address the deficit, if we don't address it, i've become more and more convinced that we don't necessarily go gradually into problems, that we could go precipitously into a problem. and i say that with reference to 2008 and to the crisis. that i think there is even when things seem to be going pretty well, there is and are some lurking dangers within our economy. one would be interest rates rising. and i ask this question all the time to people i consider to be, you know, smart, big bankers, people in the major capital centers of the world, can we control interest rates and keep interest rates low? is there a breaking point at which the central bank cannot keep interest rates at this point? because interest rates at 5%, interest rates of 7% or when i was a kid, interest rates of 19 president or 21%, i think, would be catastrophic with this burden of debt. seems to work right now, but i also think that there's a certain illusion both of wealth in the stock market and an illusion of the ease at which we can manage our debt. and so those are my con
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3